Current Weather Conditions
Conditions: Clear
Temperature: 22°
Wind Speed & Direction: 26 Kmph NNE  
Humidity: 83%
Sunrise: 7:00 AM
Sunset: 8:56 PM

Sunrise at Jandia Lighthouse, Fuerteventura
Sunrise at Jandia Lighthouse, Fuerteventura
Historic Climatic Data

MonthAverage Temperature (°C)Average Daily Max (°C)Average Daily Min (°C)Average Monthly Rainfall (mm)Humidity %Number of Rainy DaysSunshine HoursSea Temperature (°C)
January17.620.614.714682.519019
February17.92114.816692.419018
March18.922.215.512681.923318
April19.522.916565124219
May20.624.117.11660.228020
June22.525.819.1067028521
July2427.320.8069029421
August24.627.821.50710.128922
September24.427.521.22720.524623
October22.926.119.88731.722722
November20.92417.713712.220321
December18.92215.926713.218620

When is the best time to visit Fuerteventura?
When rain does occur it is usually between late October and March and it brings a touch of green to the North-West part of the Island and the mountainous areas around Betancuria. However, it is still scarce enough around the main resorts on the East coast to ensure that the landscape remains desert-like all year round. Many visitors claim that the best time to visit the Island is September and the first half of October; the weather is still summer-like at this time, the trade winds are at their lightest and the sea is at its warmest.

Climate Overview
The climate of the Island is classified as a hot desert climate according to the Koppen-Geiger classification and is influenced by many factors: the North-East Trade Winds, subtropial-latitude, proximity to Lanzarote, proximity to Africa, lack of altitude and the relatively cold Canary Current. According to Unesco, Fuerteventura is home to the largest area of desert and semi-desert in Europe.

Unlike the Western Canary Islands (and like its nearest neighbour, Lanzarote), Fuerteventura does not have high mountains. This means that the moisture-laden air just passes over the Island without depositing rain. The only exception to this is at the peaks of Jandia in the very South of the Island, which just about makes it into this zone. Lanzarote, although also a low-lying island, also provides a mild rain shadow effect as it lies to the North-West of Fuerteventura (the direction of the prevailing wind). For this reason, Fuerteventura does not experience the pronounced difference in cloudiness between the North and South that is experienced in most of the Canary Islands.

Sea Temperatures
The cold Canary current means that water temperatures are slightly cooler than you might expect at this latitude – although at 22 or 23 degrees Celsius in late summer, they are still very pleasant.

Calima
Sometimes (usually during the summer) the wind changes to a more Easterly or South-Easterly direction, bringing the dust-haze or ‘Calima’ along with searing temperatures from the Sahara Desert.

Micro-climates
There is quite a bit of variation in weather conditions from place to place according to time of year. Costa Calma can become very windy at certain times of the year (there is a reason why the Windsurf and Kitesurf Championships are held at nearby Playa Sotavento), while nearby Morro Jable is sheltered by the Island’s highest mountain range. Sea conditions also vary considerably around the Island: Surf might be up in El Cotillo, while it is flat calm in Jandia.

And while Caleta de Fuste might not offer the most spectacular beaches on Fuerteventura, the sheltered lagoon can offer water temperatures that are several degrees higher than in the open sea.