Pájara is both the name of the southernmost municipality in Fuerteventura and the small inland town that is its administrative centre. The municipality is the largest in the Canary Islands, boasts the longest municipal coastline in Spain (150km) and has many of the best beaches on the island.

Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Regla
Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Regla, Pajara, Fuerteventura
The town of Pájara is the second oldest on the island (after Betancuria) and its past is firmly rooted in agriculture, something that continues today with a steady output of tomatoes and potatoes. In the town square, Plaza Nuestra Señora de Regla, an old water wheel (camel or donkey drawn) still stands and during fiestas and special occasions you can see it in use. This leafy plaza is the heart of the town and sits between the Church of Nuestra Señora de Regla, the Town Hall and the Cultural Centre.

The main Church, Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Regla was built between 1687 and 1712. It is rather intriguing, with an Aztec-style stone facade, depicting the sun and moon, snakes eating their own tails and big cats (cougars or jaguars). This Mexican-inspired facade clearly differs from the usual baroque design of most churches on the island. It is believed that a local, returning from “the New World” influenced the unusual carvings. Inside, the church features some highly decorative retablos, which can be illuminated by placing a coin into the machine by the door. The church is best viewed in the afternoon sun, which lights up the stone facade.

Just across the road from the Church Square are several Bars and Cafes, which make for a great “rest-stop” while exploring the island. Here you can sample some local home-made cakes as well as tapas and other nibbles before continuing on.

A local festival, the fiesta de Nuestra Señora de Regla, takes place every August, with around 15 days of events and activities.

How to get to Pajara

We recommend hiring a car in order to explore the island, and, to be honest, it is difficult to get to Pajara by other means. If you are really determined to get there by Public Bus, there is an infrequent service from Morro Jable (timetable) and a slighly more frequent one from Gran Tarajal (timetable).
A taxi would cost about €50 each way.